Ely to Soham

At the moment the most direct route from Ely to Soham is 4 miles along the very busy A142 which even the most hardy cyclists would only use in emergencies.

There are two alternative routes. Via Prickwillow which is around 10 miles – more than twice the distance and probably too far for commuters to the train station. Via Barway and NCN11 which is around 6 miles, however it has an off-road section which gets very muddy in winter which again makes it unsuitable for commuters.

Essentially there is currently no way for normal people to cycle from Soham to Ely and as public transport is limited, people have no choice but to drive!

As far as we can see there are two sensible routes to enable people to cycle to and from Ely within a reasonable amount of time (20 – 25 minutes):

Ely to Soham: A142 cycle path

Currently there is a shared use path from Ely to Stuntney which is very narrow, covered in mud and dirt and for all intents and purpose unusable. There are some sections of the A142 which have a wide verge to cycle on, again that section is usually covered in dirt.…

Ely to Soham: Railway path

Network Rail announced in March 2015 that they want to widen the railway line between Ely and Soham: https://consultations.networkrail.co.uk/ely-to-soham/ely-to-soham-rail-improvements As the image below shows there will be a maintenance road on the northern side of the railway track from the river to Blockmore Road (a quiet road which leads to…

2 thoughts on “Ely to Soham

  1. Tom

    I’m a huge fan of this idea; however you need to consider how this will be funded and what will make the council want to pay for it?

    e.g. Will it reduce congestion? Could it be a complimentary, follow on, activity to the (well funded) Ely bypass to reduce congestion around the bridge by the station? How many people would actually cycle vs how many people from Soham park at Ely station? Will the Council save any money? How much will it cost to put in the cycle path? Has any cyclist been harmed travelling from Soham to Ely in rush hour – can this be avoided?

    Councils are severely stretched and so unless they can be persuaded this will save money, avoid cost, reduce risk etc. then this is unlikely to get off the ground.

  2. John Powell

    I listened to the Mayor of the Combined Authority (James Palmer) talking about transport this evening.
    He is preoccupied with big ticket items such as the Cambridge Metro. He feels he cannot justify the spend on lots of cycling infrastructure -just the odd project, like stuff to connect to his Metro.
    This is an example of the attitude of politicians. And the planners are only too happy to satisfy this desire to make a ‘big splash’ -it’s what they have been trained to do and they probably enjoy doing it.
    It has been shown time and again that measured investment in cycling infrastructure is hugely efficient spend -individual projects cost relatively little, can be completed quickly and if planned properly can take significant traffic, relieving the roads.
    So I believe the problem is that politicians and planners are addicted to the current paradigm of spending for cars.
    The solution is at a higher level than rustling up some funds. We need to force politicians to act on the clear need to persuade people to get out of their cars.
    This is the gist of Ely Cycling Campaign’s response to the Commons Select Committee and the reason why a local organisation is getting involved at a national level. But we don’t give up on the local front -we continue to give the politicians a hard time for failing to provide facilitated crossing between Ely and Stuntney and neglecting to connect the cycle route to the parking at the Leisure Village.

Leave a Reply to Tom Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>