Our presentation to the Cambridge Cycling Campaign meeting

Our presentation to the Cambridge Cycling Campaign meeting

At the Cambridge Cycling Campaign meeting on Tuesday April 2nd, Andy gave a presentation about the Ely Cycling Campaign and it’s strategy.

We were warmly welcomed by several of the Cambridge members, and the meeting began at 8pm with an audience of almost 30. The Ely Cycling Campaign was the first item on the agenda and Andy spoke for about 30 minutes about the how and why the Ely Campaign was formed and explaining the ‘Go Dutch’ principles of our strategy. There followed a question & answer session with lots of questions about both the principles of the strategy and specifics of the Ely cycle network.

There seemed to be quite wide support for Ely Cycle Campaign and it’s strategy, although, as expected, there was some resistance from a few of the longer serving Cambridge members.

(CamCycle were live tweeting the presentation you can read their tweets here – http://storify.com/ElyCycle/our-presentation-to-the-camcycle-meeting-in-their)

We (Andy & John) stayed for the rest of the meeting (until 10pm). The main items being discussed were lobbying, surveying & campaigning 3 areas: resurfacing East Road; cycle parking at the redevelopment of the Arup building (museum of Zoology & university buildings); and improvements before the roads of an estate are handed over from developers to Council control.

The last item to be discussed, concerned how the ‘Go Dutch’ system could cope with traffic turning into a side road and crossing a two-way cycle lane, especially where traffic may queue or space unavailable to ‘recess’ the cycle lane into the side road to increase visibility and allow a give way zone for a car entering the side road.

2 thoughts on “Our presentation to the Cambridge Cycling Campaign meeting

  1. Schrödinger's Cat

    “The last item to be discussed, concerned how the ‘Go Dutch’ system could cope with traffic turning into a side road and crossing a two-way cycle lane, especially where traffic may queue or space unavailable to ‘recess’ the cycle lane into the side road to increase visibility and allow a give way zone for a car entering the side road.”

    Translation:

    “Finally, the hi-vis-clad Vehicular Cycling greybeards of the CCC focussed on working out how they could claim Dutch-style infrastructure could never work in Cambridge, despite the answers being obvious and plentiful examples available.”

  2. Pingback: A10 corridor cycle route | Life in Cambridge

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